Recent Releases

Category: Recent Releases

The Indigenous peoples of Canada can be forgiven for believing that successive governments over the 150 years and more since Confederation were following a master plan devised by an evil genius to eliminate them once and for all through drastic measures of assimilation. And, of all the cruel steps taken to accomplish this goal, the most vicious was the relentless attack on their children, taking them away from their homes on reserves across the nation to residential schools, little better than reformatories, to forget their languages and families.

My friends often look at me as if trying to understand what goes on in the recesses of my brain. “Where do you get your ideas?” they ask. “You know, for murder and stuff.”

“I’m not really sure,” I usually respond, but the truth is that an idea for a storyline can come from a number of unexpected sources. A writer only needs to be open to grasping onto one when it flashes by.

There are actually two different questions in the title of this post. The first is: why is this book necessary? The origins of its argument about Canadian defence procurement can be traced all the way back to the late 1970s. Shortly after I was hired by McMaster University in 1976 to teach in the political science department, the Liberal government of Pierre Elliott Trudeau decided to buy a new fighter aircraft for Air Command (as the Royal Canadian Air Force was known back then). One of my new colleagues, Michael M.

The War of 1812 was barely over when the people of York Mills felled the trees that would become the first St. John’s Anglican Church. Built in 1816 on land that had been donated by pioneer settlers Joseph and Catherine Shepard, the little log church was the first outpost of St. James church in the Town of York and the first parish church in what would one day become the City of Toronto.

I bought my second sailboat, the first one big enough to sleep on, in 2003 when I was living in Halifax working as an editor at The Chronicle Herald.

 

It was a 1982 Tanzer 7.5, a beat-up 24-foot fibreglass boat, and when I bought it, it was sitting on the hard, as sailors say, in Chester, on the South Shore of Nova Scotia, an hour from Halifax.

 

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