Toronto's Lost Villages

Toronto's Lost Villages: A Blog

Toronto's Lost Villages

Posted on July 16 by Ron Brown in Non-fiction, Recent Releases
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I grew up in Scarborough during the 1950s. Then, it was a place of blowing grain and grazing cattle. Farm homes and barns lined the gravel roads, while hamlets and small villages clustered at the many crossroads, mill sites, and the railway stations. But poorly planned urban sprawl was creeping across the countryside and rural Scarborough was vanishing. As indeed was much of what we call today the GTA.

But that had been happening since European colonizers placed the capital of Upper Canada at the mouth of the Don River. From that time, railways and automobiles have pushed those boundaries relentlessly outward, until today that sprawl covers our entire landscape from Whitby to Stoney Creek.

Being a geographer with an historical passion, I began to seek out the vestiges of those long-ago places to share them with like-minded history-seekers. And so was born Toronto’s Lost Villages. In it, readers, be they newcomer or multi-generational, may discover amid the condo towers and the sprawl, the historic inns and churches, the elegant mansions and simple former farm homes as well as streetscapes and mill sites, even early indigenous villages, of those bygone days, that yet lie within the shadows of our modern city.

 

 

Ron Brown Author

 

 

Ron Brown

Posted by Dundurn Guest on October 30, 2014
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Ron Brown

Ron Brown, a geographer and travel writer, has authored more than twenty books, including Canada’s World Wonders and The Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore. A past chair of the Writers’ Union of Canada and a current member of the East York Historical Society, he gives lectures and conducts tours along Ontario’s back roads. Ron lives in Toronto.