Canadian

Category: Canadian

Go Local for Your Summer Vacation

Posted on July 9 by Dundurn Guest in Non-fiction

7 Books to Guide Your Summer Adventures in Your Backyard and Beyond!

 

The Great Canadian Bucket List by Robin Esrock

Need to plan your summer, but want to stay off the beaten track? Join the Canadians who’ve discovered The Great Canadian Bucket List and its one-of-a-kind travel experiences. Find Canada’s most incredible experiences from every province and territory and add them to your own bucket list.

 

Two Award Nominations for Spin

Dundurn Press is thrilled to congratulate YA author Colleen Nelson on receiving two award nominations! Spin, Nelson’s seventh novel for young adults, has been shortlisted for the 2021 Manitoba Young Readers Choice Northern Lights Award as well as the 2020 High Plains Book Award in the Young Adult category.

True Patriots Blog

Hello Canada,

 

I’d like to introduce you to my first novel, an action thriller called True Patriots. It will be published by Dundurn Press at the end of February.

Remember the East-versus-West bickering during last fall’s election? The arguments seem trapped in a perpetual cycle, resurfacing every few years. What if things got really out of hand the next time? I mean really, really got out of hand. That’s the premise of my novel.

Flights and Falls Blog

I'm so proud to introduce Flights and Falls, the fourth book in my B.C. Blues crime series.

This one takes place in North Vancouver and out past Horseshoe Bay along the Sea-to-Sky Highway, and the challenge for my team begins with a crash. From the cliffs overlooking the Burrard Inlet, someone with a vile sense of humour is systematically scaring drivers to death, and the game is fishtailing out of control.

Little did I know four years ago when I began researching a book on the history of reporters on Parliament Hill — before the elections of Justin Trudeau and Donald Trump — that it would be published at the height of a great debate about the future of journalism and the credibility of its practitioners. But as sure as the word “news” follows “fake” these days, as I tour the country promoting Power, Prime Ministers and the Press, interviewers are asking questions that reflect an uncertain public mood about the press. Who to trust? What to believe?

Before the mid-twentieth century, if you’d asked someone to describe a quintessentially Canadian story, they might’ve used the words “historical” and “wilderness”. That’s because many of the popular Canadian books from this period — such as Wacousta (1832) or The Man From Glengarry (1901) — followed characters contending with natural forces and historical contexts. These kinds of books created a mythology around a so-called Canadian identity: a mythology rooted in the natural landscape and a particular version of the country’s history.

Tell us about your book: What was your inspiration? Were there overarching themes you felt compelled to explore?

I was inspired to write about my tour in Afghanistan after I came home in 2006 and this resulted in the strict accounting of events and combat actions described in my first book, What the Thunder Said: Reflections of a Canadian Officer in Afghanistan (2009). This book is a war story of a logistics unit.  It is all about the “up and out” experiences of my battalion. 

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